Categories
development

Magento 2 on Heroku

Magento 2

Magento 2 on Heroku is what powers the metatooth.com online shop. This is a WordPress.org blog running on Heroku. Look for a post on integrating the two in the future. My first step was to deploy to Heroku. Here’s one of the few resources I found, but it is a good one.

https://www.chrisgrice.com/blog/magento-on-heroku-part-1/

In a nutshell, download the latest 2.x version from https://magento.com/tech-resources/download Then unpack, create a local git repository & commit.


$ mkdir Magento
$ cd Magento
$ tar xjvf ~/Downloads/Magento-CE-2.3.4-2020-01-16-11-26-09.tar.bz2
$ git init
$ git add .
$ git commit -m "Initial commit of Magento"

Normally, you would have to move auth.json.sample to auth.json in the repository to allow Composer to pull from the Magento repository. The PHP buildpack for Heroku will use the value of the COMPOSER_AUTH environment variable instead. It should also be in JSON format, as shown below.


$ heroku create
$ heroku config:set COMPOSER_AUTH='{ "http-basic": { "repo.magento.com": { "username": "<public-key>", "password": "<private-key>" }}}'
$ git push heroku master

Need an authentication key? I relied on the following documentation.

https://devdocs.magento.com/guides/v2.3/install-gde/prereq/connect-auth.html

Are you using WordPress and Magento 2 on Heroku? Tell me about it in the comments!

Categories
coding

NGINX Heroku WordPress

NGINX, Heroku, and WordPress combined. This website is powered by WordPress on Heroku. Details on configuration are here.

My next #DevOps task is to add NGINX in front of the WordPress application. In the future, this could be used as a load balancer. Until then, NGINX will reverse proxy the requests to the Heroku application instance.

To start, I spun up a virtual machine running Ubuntu on Amazon’s EC2. Check out how to install and configure NGINX here. Make sure to open your firewall to HTTP & HTTPS traffic!

I encountered two major issues:

  1. The request passed by NGINX through the reverse proxy was not being understood by Heroku’s application stack.
  2. Once the application stack properly handled the request, WordPress’s response triggered a redirect loop.

Reverse Proxy

Heroku’s stack uses the host of the request to route to the appropriate application instance. The originating Host value is (in my example) ‘wwww.metatooth.com’. Heroku shouldn’t respond to this. Turn off the app’s Custom Domain feature if it does. Update the reverse proxy to set a new Host header that Heroku will respond to.

server {
    server_name www.metatooth.com;

    location / {
        proxy_pass https://calm-waters-18762.herokuapp.com;
        proxy_set_header Host calm-waters-18762.herokuapp.com;
    }

    # configure SSL here
}

Redirect Loop

Setting the Host request header got Heroku’s attention, now WordPress responds to that request with a redirect loop. I encountered this problem while trying to configure an HTTPS-only WordPress installation. The way out of the redirect loop was to update two more request headers and then to use those headers in the WordPress configuration. Here’s the new section of wp-config.php

 
if ( $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_PROTO'] == 'https' )
{
        $_SERVER['HTTPS']       = 'on';
        $_SERVER['SERVER_PORT'] = '443';
        define('FORCE_SSL_ADMIN', true);
}

if ( isset($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_HOST']) ) {
        $_SERVER['HTTP_HOST'] = $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_HOST'];
}

That gets WordPress to not redirect to https on these proxied requests, but only if the request headers of X-Forwarded-Proto and X-Forwarded-Host are specified. The NGINX configuration now is:

server {
    server_name www.metatooth.com;

    location / {
        proxy_pass https://calm-waters-18762.herokuapp.com;
        proxy_set_header Host calm-waters-18762.herokuapp.com;
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Host $host;    
        proxy_set_header X-Forwarded-Proto $scheme;
    }

    # configure SSL here
}

That’s how I got NGINX, Heroku, and WordPress to play well together. Next task is to use an upstream for the proxy_pass directives. What’s your infrastructure layout and what did you learn along the way? Tell me about it in the comments!

Categories
coding

Docker Ubuntu 19.04

Docker on Ubuntu 19.04 is a cinch. “Dockerizing” an application is a great way to ensure you understand it’s dependencies. I always forget this last bit when setting up a new machine.

sudo usermod -aG docker username

Otherwise, I recommend this Medium post by Grigor Khachatryan.

https://medium.com/@Grigorkh/how-to-install-docker-on-ubuntu-19-04-7ccfeda5935

It turns out that LAMP Ubuntu 19.04 is the most popular Metatooth blog post. Can’t argue with success. More #DevOps posts forthcoming! I’ll certainly keep posting about teeth and technology, too.

What other “crowdsourced” finding has surprised you recently? Tell me about it in the comments!

 

Categories
coding

LAMP Ubuntu 19.04

LAMP on Ubuntu 19.04 should be a snap, and it is. If you install all the packages! I was missing libapache2-mod-php and php-mysql. Here’s the blog post that helped me out.

How To Install Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP (LAMP) stack on Ubuntu 16.04

LAMP starts with Linux

Ubuntu 19.04 also provides a meta-package for this.
sudo apt-get install lamp-server^ will install all dependencies, and give instructions for enabling PHP under Apache2. Mind the trailing caret (^)! This meta-package selects MySQL 5.7 over MariaDB 10.3. A brief search indicates this is the best choice.

 

Why am I doing this? In order to have a development environment for this WordPress 5 website. WordPress is widely used, but is not this developer’s cup of tea. However, it does have a strong community and it’s development is ongoing, so time to get on the bandwagon. Or at least use a staging methodology to push changes to www.metatooth.com.

My first website was of the LAMP variety. I guess 20 years is not that long for a platform’s life-cycle. What platform’s longevity surprises you? Tell me about it in the comments!